Weekly Photo Challenge: Heritage — Dutch Clogs (Klompen)

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This post is in response to the Weekly Photo Challenge: Heritage.

During our recent trip to Amsterdam,  we visited a clogs workshop. Take a look at these beautiful clogs.  Don’t you want to bring a pair home? To wear or not to wear?  That’s the question!

Although clogs are worn in many cultures around the world:  the Dutch,  Japanese, Chinese, Swedes etc,  the clogs that have the “whole foot style”  are primarily Dutch.  In Holland, the clogs are called “Klompen”.  Dutch clogs are an important part of the Dutch heritage.  Although we don’t see people wearing clogs in the street, it is estimated that about three millions are made annually.  Most likely, many are sold to tourists.

Why do the Dutch wear clogs?

Long time ago, during the Roman era, much of the land in The Netherlands was covered with mud. Therefore a specialized footwear needed to be developed as a way to get around the sludgy, muddy terrain.  As a result Clogs were created and used for this purpose until around the 19th century. The clogs also functioned as a protective footwear to prevent people’s feet being hurt by strayed nails or debris.  

Take a closer look at the clogs which I posted here.  Which pair would you buy and bring home? Did I buy any of them?  Guess!

References:

http://www.woodenshoes.nl/en/craftmanship

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klomp

http://www.theworldorbust.com/history-of-clogs/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Comments Add yours

  1. It’s not an easy task to walk in these shoes …

    1. friendlytm says:

      Thank you for stopping by and your comments. Indeed it is hard to wear those clogs. I quickly browsed at your blog posts. They are all very interesting. Thanks for sharing.

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